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PCADV FILES BRIEF AGAINST DISCRIMINATORY HOUSING ORDINANCE

House Bill 1796 Would Protect Victims of Crime and Abuse From Eviction

Pennsylvania "is now hopefully going to be a model of how the state came together with Representative Stephens’ leadership, recognized an ill, and took action to fix it.” Laurie Baughman, PCADV Senior Attorney, is quoted in this article about the General Assembly's recent vote to prevent domestic violence survivors from being unfairly evicted for calling police for help.

US Senator Robert Casey Urges Federal Action on Nuisance Ordinances

Sen. Casey cites PCADV and the Lakesha Briggs case in urging education about VAWA protections for domestic violence victims

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    Letter of July 19, 2013 to the Departments of Justice and Housing from Sen. Casey of Pennsylvania.

    972.92 K | 8/16/2013

Ordinances Force Victims to Choose Between Help and Homelessness

PCADV filed an amicus (friend of the court) brief on May 31 in Briggs v. Norristown in support of Lakisha Briggs. Ms. Briggs' federal lawsuit challenges the Norristown, Pennsylvania, nuisance ordinance that forced her into eviction proceedings after police were called to her residence on three occasions. Peg Dierkers, PCADV Executive Director, explained, "We are fighting this ordinance in Pennsylvania to protect victims in our state and because we know that it has far-reaching consequences. We hope our work helps to end these harmful ordinances across the nation."

PCADV was joined by the PCADV Women of Color Caucus, 17 local domestic violence programs across Pennsylvania, and 4 national programs, including the National Network to End Domestic Violence NNEDV, Futures Without Violence, the National Housing Law Project, and the Sargent Shriver National Center on Poverty Law.

NNEDV issued a press release announcing their support for PCADV's Amicus Brief. "No victim of abuse should have to choose between calling the police and becoming homeless" said Kim Gandy, President and CEO of NNEDV. Gandy went on to explain, "This mean-spirited ordinance pits the need for shelter against the need for safety from violence. … Any policy that dissuades victims from reaching out for help will have deadly consequences."

Oral argument in this case is scheduled for August 15, 2013, before the Honorable Eduardo C. Robreno at the United States District Court, Eastern District of Pennsylvania.

ACLU files constitutional challenge to Norristown, Pennsylvania ordinance
April 24, 2013
Lakisha Briggs was threatened with eviction when police responded to her home for a third domestic violence call. The local "nuisance" ordinance forces landlords to evict tenants if police are repeatedly called to their homes. Many cities in Pennsylvania have these ordinances, which punish victims of domestic violence with homelessness for calling for help.

The first time Lakisha’s ex-boyfriend showed up at her home and assaulted her, she called for police assistance. But, when police responded to her call for help a second time, they informed her that a local ordinance required her landlord to evict her if she called police a third time. Lakisha was so afraid of eviction that she stopped calling the police for help... even when her ex-boyfriend attacked her. Fortunately, neighbors stepped up and called police and Lakisha was airlifted to the hospital for treatment. After this horrific assault, police informed Lakisha that the neighbor’s call was her third strike and threatened to force her out of her home.

On April 24, 2013, the ACLU-PA, ACLU-Women's Rights Project and the law firm of Pepper Hamilton filed a federal housing lawsuit, Briggs v. Borough of Norristown, on Lakisha's behalf. Both ACLU programs have partnered with PCADV in efforts to address homelessness and domestic violence. PCADV supports their efforts in filing this suit. We believe justice will prevail for Lakisha and other victims who face eviction for calling police. Read the ACLU statement

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